UK Man Has Head Injury Repaired Using 3-D Printer and Super Glue

by on 17/05/15 at 11:13 am

Skoob says the most unpleasant thing before he had his surgery was the puddle of water that accumulated on the top of his head after showering. It was especially bothersome when he bowed his head to say grace at mealtime causing the runoff to float the peas off his plate. Now, he says water just rolls off, though things like paper clips and staples are attracted and stick to his head since the surgery.

Ian Skoob says the most unpleasant thing before he had his surgery was the puddle of water that accumulated on the top of his head after showering. It was especially bothersome when he bowed his head to say grace at mealtime which caused the runoff water to fall and float the peas off his plate. Now, he says water just rolls off normally, though things like paper clips, car keys, and staples are attracted and stick to his head since the surgery.


The last photo of Ian before his tragic accident.

The last photo of Ian before his tragic accident.

Portsmouth (UK) – (satireworld.com)

Doctors at Queen Alexandra Hospital have used 3D printing technology to replace most of a man’s missing skull in an innovative procedure which included using simple Super Glue in a process that is sure to revolutionize orthopedic surgery.

The groundbreaking surgery occurred last week, when 85 percent of a patient’s skull was replaced with an implant from an Oxford Performance Materials 3-D printer and a tube of Super Glue found in a tool box left by a plumber who was fixing a clogged drain under the operating table.

According to the Portsmouth Globe, the Oxford-based company shapes implants specifically to the anatomy of each patient, who in this case, was a 68 year old unemployed parts and tool maker named Ian Skoob.

The implant is called the Lead Head Patient Specific Cranial Device, (or LHPSCD), which is made from recycled lead from car batteries and printer’s type, which is similar to the material in Ian Skoob’s original skull of which only about 15% remained prior to the implant surgery a few days ago.

During the process of 3D printing, which is also known as additive manufacturing, a digital model becomes a three-dimensional, solid object as multiple layers of lead material are laid down and shaped, according to Dr. Stuart Kerr, head of 3-D printing.

The technology could revolutionize the health care industry, as well as, the hazardous material recycling of polluting lead-based items.

“It is our firm belief that the combination of soft malleable lead and Additive Manufacturing…is a highly trans formative and disruptive technology platform that will substantially impact all sectors of the orthopedic industry,” Dr. Ian Ellis-Fields, President and CEO of Oxford Performance Materials, said in a press release.

Ian Skoob lived with most of his skull missing since 1997 when he inadvertently stuck his head up through a moon roof on a speeding Audi as it approached a low overhanging cement tunnel support. Though inebriated at the time, it was four full days before Mr. Skoob finally visited a local hospital where they filled in the remaining portions of his skull with temporary fix of plaster of paris and gave him a pork-pie hat from the Lost and Found to hide the hideous aftermath of the accident.

When asked why he waited for four days before seeking medical attention, Skoob said he owed seeking medical attention to his wife who complained for three previous nights about how messy his pillow case was and she how sick and tired she was of changing it each morning.

Mr. Skoob says he feels great now, but does feel a bit tired at the end of the day from carrying an addition 75 lbs of lead on his shoulders. The plus side he says is…”I can drink me Stella faster and it stays cold longer due to the extra metal in my head!”

Ian Skoob says he still plans on wearing his old pork-pie hat which has been his trade-mark since the accident. As far as what’s in-store for him in the future, Ian thinks he can win a few more bets and free beers by easily standing on his head down at the Leaking Hag Pub in Portsmouth for periods up to several hours.



2 Responses to “UK Man Has Head Injury Repaired Using 3-D Printer and Super Glue”

  1. SanFranciscoOnion

    May 17th, 2015

    LOL!

    I knew this idiot Skoob from my days back writing on the Spoof.

    What a dickwad this guy was. Sadly, people hated him and that other jerkoff Colonel Juan for being a bully.

  2. Bargis

    May 17th, 2015

    Yes we all know…

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